JammedUp News

News

CONTAINS DISTURBING IMAGES: 43 New Generation Cartel Members Killed in 3 Hour Shootout with Mexican Security Forces

May 23, 2015  |  Posted by: JammedUp Staff
CONTAINS DISTURBING IMAGES: 43 New Generation Cartel Members Killed in 3 Hour Shootout with Mexican Security Forces

Are you in a legal jam? Find a Lawyer, Bail Bondsman or Private Investigator on JammedUp.

MEXICO CITY — In the wake of A shootout between members the powerful Jalisco New Generation Cartel and Mexican security forces in the western state of Michoacan have left at over 40 narco- syndicate members dead Friday, according to Mexican officials.

The violence unfolded in the morning near the town of Tanhuato, along Michoacan’s border with the state of Jalisco, a troubled region where two drug cartels have waged a long-running battle and where attacks against Mexican authorities have recently spiked.

Mexican authorities offered few details Friday afternoon about the killings, which involved the New Generation cartel of Jalisco and a convoy of federal police and soldiers. The governor of Michoacan, Salvador Jara, said on a radio address that at least one policeman died, as well as 42 gunmen, although those numbers were not confirmed. Photographs from the scene showed authorities had recovered dozens of high-powered rifles.

The bodies of men who authorities say were suspected cartel gunman lie next to farm equipment at the Rancho del Sol, near Ecuanduero, in western Mexico

The bodies of men who authorities say were suspected cartel gunman lie next to farm equipment at the Rancho del Sol, near Ecuanduero, in western Mexico

National Security Commissioner Monte Alejandro Rubido confirmed the death toll including the federal policeman died and another was injured in the three hour battle on a ranch just inside the Michoacan state border with Jalisco, home of Guadalajara, Mexico’s second-biggest city.

The death toll was one of the heaviest to hit Mexico since President Enrique Pena Nieto took office in December 2012 pledging to put an end to years of gangland violence that have claimed more than 100,000 lives since 2007 alone.

Government officials said the 42 killed by security forces near the town of Tanhuato were suspected members of the Jalisco New Generation (JNG) cartel, a gang based in the neighboring state that has seriously undermined Pena Nieto’s pledge.

The gunfight began after security forces alerted to an “invasion” of the ranch approached the 112 hectare property and were fired upon by a group of armed men, Rubido said.

Mexico Violence

After calling in air and ground support, government forces ground down their opponents with the aid of a helicopter, in the end capturing three suspected gang members and seizing a grenade launcher and 39 guns of varying calibers, he added.

Earlier, a government official told Reuters that two federal police had died in the exchanges near Tanhuato, where a week ago, federal forces replaced local police after the assassination of a candidate for mayor in a nearby town.

Rubido said officials from the national human rights commission (CNDH) had been sent to the ranch, where the number of dead was the highest in any clash between the government and suspected gangsters since a controversial incident last June.

Then, the government first reported that 22 gang members were killed in a shootout with soldiers in central Mexico. However, subsequent investigations showed that more than half of the dead had been executed, embarrassing the government.

ELECTION LOOMS

Jalisco is one of the engines of the Mexican economy, but the state’s southern border turned into a battleground between the JNG and the Michoacan-based Knights Templars, a gang whose leadership has been shattered over the past 18 months.

Capitalizing on the Templars’ losses, the JNG has become the biggest threat to the government, killing at least 20 police since March. On May 1, its gunmen shot down an army helicopter in southwestern Jalisco, claiming the lives of six military personnel.

The gang also set vehicles, banks and gas stations ablaze around Guadalajara in a series of concerted attacks that day, shaking confidence in the federal government’s ability to contain the violence ahead of mid-term elections on June 7.

Pena Nieto’s ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party hopes to defend the slim majority it and its allies have in the lower house of Congress, with polls suggesting it could.

Federal police stand near the bodies of men who authorities say were suspected cartel gunmen at the Rancho del Sol, near Ecuanduero, in western Mexico

Federal police stand near the bodies of men who authorities say were suspected cartel gunmen at the Rancho del Sol, near Ecuanduero, in western Mexico

A priest at a nearby church, Manuel Navarro, said that he and his parishioners could see black smoke rising at the scene of the violence but that the townspeople continued to work and go out in the streets.

“The people must be scared,” he said. “But what are we going to do?

“Everybody knows there were killings, but the people just say, ‘God help us,’ ” he added.

The New Generation cartel has grown into one of the country’s most powerful drug gangs and has been involved in several large-scale attacks against authorities in recent months. In April, the group ambushed a convoy of state police officers as they drove through a rural gorge, killing 15 of them. This month, gunmen shot down a Mexican military helicopter with a rocket-propelled grenade, killing six soldiers.

Authorities in Jalisco have expressed concern that they are not getting enough help from the federal government to halt the expansion of the New Generation cartel.

Get the latest news from the world of crime