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Affluenza mom, Tonya Couch arrives in Texas to face charges

January 8, 2016  |  Posted by: JammedUp Staff
Affluenza mom, Tonya Couch arrives in Texas to face charges

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Tonya Couch, the mother of Ethan Couch, the 18-year-old affluenza teen who went on the lam from Texas authorities, arrived in Dallas on Thursday to face a charge of aiding her son evade capture.

Couch landed at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport and was escorted by police officers, after she was deported last week from Mexico.

Police apprehended she and her 18-year-old son in the resort city of Puerto Vallarta. A judge gave Ethan Couch a stay of execution. However, she was extradited to Los Angeles and ordered back to Texas after a hearing on Tuesday.

“Tonya Couch is being taken to jail. She faces a charge of hindering the apprehension of a felon, and her bond were set at $1 million,” the Tarrant County sheriff’s department said in a press release.

Ethan Couch won a court reprieve based on a legal appeal in Mexico; now the process could take months to resolve.

Stephanie K. Patten and Steve Gordon, Tonya Couch’s attorneys, released a statement last week denying any wrong-doing.

“While the public may not like what she did, may not agree with what she did, or may have strong feelings about what she did. But make no mistake — Tonya did not violate any law of the State of Texas, and she is eager to have her day in court,” the attorney’s statement read.

Authorities said the mother and son fled to Mexico from Texas in November after prosecutors began investigating whether Ethan Couch violated the rules of his probation after a video surfaced showing Couch at a party where people were drinking alcohol.

The teen was arrested for the 2013 fatal drunken-driving wreck that killed four people. He pled guilty in juvenile court to four counts of intoxication manslaughter and two counts of intoxication assault causing serious bodily injury.

He was given to 10 years’ probation after a defense expert testified that because Couch had been coddled too much by his wealthy parents, it created a condition, which the expert called “affluenza.”

The American Psychiatric Association does not recognize affluenza as diagnosis for a medical condition.

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