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Report accuses Putin of ordering assassination of former Russian spy at London hotel

January 23, 2016  |  Posted by: JammedUp Staff
Report accuses Putin of ordering assassination of former Russian spy at London hotel

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A new report by Sir Robert Owen, a retired British high court judge released Thursday, accuses Russian President Vladimir Putin of ordering the assassination of a Russian dissident, who accused Putin of having sex with underaged children and claimed video evidence had existed backing his claims.

Alexander Litvinenko, a former Russian spy, died by radioactive poison after two spies poisoned the man’s green tea with lemon and honey at an upscale London hotel.

The report says that on Nov. 1, 2006, Litvinenko had a meeting at the pine-paneled barroom in the Millennium in the city’s Mayfair district with former KGB agents Andrei Lugovoi and Dmitry Kovtun.

The bartender, who was working that day and had served the three men, told British investigators that just before sitting down together, Lugovoi asked for a cigar.

“The bill recorded that there were three guests in the group and that they had sat at Table 1,” said the report, which implicates the two men along with Russia’s spy agency and Putin himself in the events that would soon transpire.

“Some drinks were listed on the bill, both alcoholic and nonalcoholic, one of the items on the bill was “3 Tea.”

The report states that the bartender “recalled the order for green tea with lemon and honey. Litvinenko’s colleague made the tea in one large pot behind the bar and brought the pot with the cups to the table,” the report says.

Three weeks later: Alexander Litvinenko, dies of radioactive poisoning after he accused Vladimir Putin of being a pedophile

Three weeks later: Alexander Litvinenko dies of radioactive poisoning after he accused Vladimir Putin of being a pedophile

The bartender told British authorities “It was not the barman’s practice to pour tea for customers. He said that the teapots used were made of white porcelain.”

The report says the man had, “Understandably, paid only limited attention to the group at Mr. Lugovoi’s table and did not hear their conversation.”

The barkeep also describes how there was nothing unusual about how the well-dressed men acted, he described them as acting calm and ‘very well behaved.”

“In particular, he did not notice anything unusual about the tea or the way that it had been drunk,” the witness stated.

‘It was as ordinary as any other table or any other time.”

Litvinenko told investigators from his hospital bed; he met Lugovoi at the hotel, who had led him to a corner table of the bar, Kovtun soon joined them.

“The victim described drinking green tea that was already on the table,” the report said.
“There were a few mugs on the table, and there was also a teapot,” Litvinenko told investigators.

Litvinenko did not want to drink anything; he told probers. However, before they left, Lugovoi pointed to the teapot, “He said, ‘OK, well we’re going to leave now, there is still some tea left if you want you can have some.”

“Andre [Lugovoi ] asked the waiter for a clean cup, and he bought it [sic]. I poured some tea out, although there was only a half a cup left, maybe about 50 grams,” Litvinenko said.

Sir Robert Owen's inquiry named Andrei Lugovoi, left, and Dmitri Kovtun, right, as the two men responsible for carrying out the orders to kill Litvinenko by slipping radioactive polonium into a teapot

Sir Robert Owen’s inquiry named Andrei Lugovoi, left, and Dmitri Kovtun, right, as the two men responsible for carrying out the orders to kill Litvinenko by slipping radioactive polonium into a teapot

He continued “I swallowed several times, but it was green tea with no sugar, and it was already cold by the way. For some reason I didn’t like it, so I stopped drinking the tea.”

“I swallowed maybe three or four times; I didn’t even finished the cup,” Litvinenko said.

He also explained how Kovtun had brazenly invited his wife and 8-year-old son — also staying at the hotel — to the table to say hello to the now-poisoned victim.

“He said, ‘This is Uncle Sasha, shake his hand,’ ” Litvinenko remembered.

The hotel’s surveillance camera shows the men meeting lasted less than 30 minutes.
A few hours later the Putin critic fell sick; it would be the start of a cruel and painful death three weeks later in a London hospital room.

Litvinenko blamed Putin right before he died.

The report concluded: “The forensic and other evidence strongly indicates that it was during this meeting that Mr. Litvinenko drank green tea poisoned with polonium.”

Litvinenko had been a consistent thorn in Putin’s side since he defected from the Russian spy service and fled to London in 2000.

He had written numerous books and articles in both English and Russian, where he had repeatedly accused the ruthless Putin of seizing and maintaining political power through a campaign of intimidation and violence.

Four months before his death, Litvinenko accused Putin of being a child molester and published a humiliating report that presented evidence on a Russian news site that reportedly exposed the Russian President as a pedophile.

Litvinenko said that video existed backing his allegations, but claimed Putin destroyed the footage, which allegedly saw him flee Russia.

The former KGB agent knew about the threats on his life; having been warned on the very day of his poisoning by an Italian colleague that he was on a “hit list” kept by Russian security services agents.

Two weeks after the incident, Litvinenko’s condition puzzled doctors, who then realized that his hair loss and constant vomiting of blood was attributed to acute radiation poisoning.

The Millenium Hotel in London, where Litvinenko was poisoned

The Millenium Hotel in London, where Litvinenko was poisoned

Investigators discovered traces of the radiation all over the Millenium hotel, including in the rooms where the men had stayed and throughout the Pine Bar.

“Authorities saw the highest readings in [Kovtun’s] bathroom and found the highest of those readings in a sediment trap below the plughole in the bathroom,” the report says.

“Therefore, it is more than likely that the polonium in one form or another had been poured down the plughole.”

Investigators tested all of the hotel teapots and quickly detected the one that contained the cold green tea.

A forensic investigator told probers.“At some stage,” researchers found, “polonium . . . It was poured out of the spout, I think that’s the only conclusion you can come to.”

Before his death, Litvinenko said of Putin, “You have shown yourself to be as barbaric and ruthless as your most hostile critics have claimed.”

He added, “The howl of protest from around the world will reverberate, Mr. Putin, in your ears for the rest of your life.”

Owen’s report appears to prove him right.

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