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U.S. Senate pass bill allowing families of victims of Sept 11th, to sue Saudi government despite threat of veto

May 18, 2016  |  Posted by: JammedUp Staff
U.S. Senate pass bill allowing families of victims of Sept 11th, to sue Saudi government despite threat of veto

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President Obama and Senate Democrats appear to be on a collision course after legislation passed in the U.S. Senate on Tuesday that would enable families of the victims of the Sept. 11 attacks in New York, Washington, and Pennsylvania, to sue the Saudi Arabian government

Senators approved the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act sponsored by Sen Chuck Schumer along with Texas Sen John Cornyn.

The Saudi government previously threatened to pull Billions from the U.S. economy if the measured was voted into law.

The legislation gives victims’ families the right to sue the government of Saudi Arabia in U.S. court for any role that elements of the Saudi government may have played in the attacks.

The Obama administration has threatened to veto the legislation claiming the bill would expose Americans overseas to legal risks or litigation and claim the bill fails to address White House concerns regarding the preservation of sovereign immunity.

“Given the concerns that we’ve expressed, it’s difficult to imagine the president signing this legislation,” Earnest told reporters at the White House.

However,  Schumer was confident the Senate had the necessary two-thirds vote of the chamber to override a presidential veto and disagreed with White House arguments that the measure could encourage retaliation or litigation against the United States.

“We’re not busy training people to blow up buildings and kill innocent civilians in other countries,” Schumer said at a press conference.

He added, “We don’t think their arguments stand up, any foreign government that aids terrorists who strike the U.S. will pay a price if it is proven they have done so.”

The bill must now be voted on by the House.

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