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Oklahoma teen accepts plea deal for killing parents and siblings

September 9, 2016  |  Posted by: Francesca Falzarano
Oklahoma teen accepts plea deal for killing parents and siblings

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An Oklahoma teen, who slashed his parents and three brothers and sister to death, was spared from execution on Wednesday after accepting a plea deal.

Robert Bever was sentenced in Tulsa County District Court after pleading guilty to the killings that took place in July 2015, which he allegedly committed along with his 17-year-old brother Michael, the Daily Mail, reported.

Prosecutors presented him with the opportunity to accept a plea deal that would see him spend life behind bars without parole in hopes that it would avoid his surviving 13-year-old sister Crystal from being forced to testify and relive the traumatic event in court, according to The Tulsa World.

Steve Kunzweiler, the district attorney for Tulsa County, said at a press conference announcing the plea deal that Bever’s crimes were “savage” and that he “deserves the death penalty.”

However, Kunzweiler noted that “a death penalty prosecution would result in his teenage sister being forced to recount and relive the brutal details of the carnage that her brothers wrought again and again.”

He also added that the plea deal suggested that the second survivor, 2-year-old Autumn, would be able to grow up free from the darkness of the horrific murders.

“The toddler sister, who mercifully was asleep and did not witness the horror, would grow up learning details of the carnage in repeated court hearings that could easily stretch into her teen years or beyond,” said the prosecutor.

Michael Bever, who is alleged to have assisted his brother in carrying out the brutal slayings, pleaded not guilty at his arraignment. His trial is set to begin sometime in 2017.

The Bever brothers are accused of murdering their parents, April, 44 and David Bever, 52, and their three siblings Daniel, 12; Christopher, 7, and Victoria, 5, in the middle-of-the-night massacre.

Family: Robert (seen in red shirt) killed Daniel, 12 (far right); Christopher, 7 (far left); and Victoria, 5 (center, in pink).  His 13-year-old sister Crystal (second left) survived, and two-year-old sister Autumn was not harmed in the attack

Family: Robert (seen in red shirt) killed Daniel, 12 (far right); Christopher, 7 (far left); and Victoria, 5 (center, in pink). His 13-year-old sister Crystal (second left) survived, and two-year-old sister Autumn was not harmed in the attack

Investigators who testified at an initial hearing back in February said the brothers clearly described to authorities their grim plans to commit additional mass murders across the country after killing their family.

“They wanted to kill at least 50 people; they wanted to be famous. They wanted a Wikipedia page. They wanted media coverage,” said Detective Rhianna Russell, who had questioned Michael Bever.

Detective Eric Bentz affirmed that Robert Bever was evidently upset that their plan collapsed and “everyone didn’t die like they were supposed to.”

Additionally, he stated that Bever was “laughing” as he talked about their plans in great detail.

The investigator told the court that Robert Bever exhibited a desire for fame for being a serial killer and that he’d intended to kill the family, chop up the bodies and deposit them in bins in the attic.

The gruesome siblings then prepared to head west in the family vehicle armed with guns, ammo and homemade bombs with the intention to attack other locations at random and kill ten people each.

They  planned to produce a pair of videos: one with bodies in plain sight for authorities and prosecutors, and a second without the bodies that would be posted on the internet.

“If he killed one person, he was one person, that evened it out,” Detective Bentz said of Robert’s motives, while “if he killed one more than one person, that would make him like a god.”

According to their neighbors, the Bevers were relatively quiet and kept to themselves – the siblings often played alone in the yard and walked through the neighborhood banded together, and their parents didn’t socialize much with others in the community.

David Bever’s past co-workers at a local IT office referred to him as a quiet man.

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