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“Narco Nephews’ of Venezuela’s Nicholas Maduro bragged about using Presidential runway to traffic cocaine

September 10, 2016  |  Posted by: JammedUp Staff
“Narco Nephews’ of Venezuela’s Nicholas Maduro bragged about using Presidential runway to traffic cocaine

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An official with the Drug Enforcement Administration accused the Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro of not only protecting major drug traffickers but also claimed to be complicit in the trafficking of illegal narcotics to the U.S.

The explosive allegations were made by DEA special agent Sandalio Gonzalez during a court hearing on Thursday in Manhattan federal court.

Gonzalez revealed that the nephews of Venezuelan President Nicholas Maduro boasted about using the presidential ramp to board drug-laden planes at a major international airport in Caracas.

The special agent also accused the inspector general of Venezuela’s investigative police and the nephew’s uncle, Bladimir Flores, of having involvement in flying the planes filled with narcotics from Venezuela to Honduras.

Efrain Campo and Francisco Flores, the two nephews of Venezuela’s powerful first lady, Cilia Flores, face drug trafficking charges in a federal criminal indictment in the United States.

However, the case has since expanded to determine what role the Venezuelan government plays in the country’s burgeoning drug trade.

Gonzalez said since initiating the investigation into Maduro’s nephews; the United States government never alerted the government of Venezuela because authorities in that country had in the past targeted DEA informants.

According to Gonzalez, U.S. investigators uncovered the involvement of the nephews Nicholas Maduro in narcotics trafficking as a result of unrelated drug probes in Venezuela, which led investigators to discover that the Flores brothers conspired to import 1,800 pounds of cocaine into the United States.

The federal agent also detailed an effort in Honduras to capture them last Fall after a major drug trafficking informant had tipped off the DEA.

“At the beginning of October, he indicated that a Venezuelan official by the name of Bladimir Flores was going to send his nephews to Honduras to meet with CW-1” [Cooperating Witness-1–which is the designation the DEA had gave the drug dealing informant].

In this courtroom sketch, a U.S. marshall stands guard in the background as defense attorney John Reilly, left, Francisco Flores, center in blue shirt, Efrain Campos, second from right, and defense attorney Rebekah Poston make an initial appearance in Manhattan federal court on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2015, in New York. An indictment unsealed on Thursday accuses Campos and Flores, nephews of Venezuela's first lady, of conspiring to smuggle cocaine into the United States. (AP Photo/Elizabeth Williams)

In this courtroom sketch, a U.S. marshall stands guard in the background as defense attorney John Reilly, left, Francisco Flores, center in blue shirt, Efrain Campos, second from right, and defense attorney Rebekah Poston during their initial appearance in Manhattan federal court on, Nov. 12, 2015, in New York.

Additionally, the source “indicated that these individuals planned to to fly drug-laden planes to Honduras with full flight plans.”

Authorities apprehended the nephews in Haiti in December of last year and were both subsequently extradited to New York City, where they will stand trial for charges listed in the indictment.

During his testimony, Gonzalez described the nephews as big time drug traffickers, who arranged the smuggling of significant shipments of cocaine as big as 1,600 kilograms on private planes and promised easy access to major airports because of their political connections.

“They indicated they had the run the main airport in Caracas and could quickly dispatch drug-laden planes on the presidential runway,” Gonzalez said.

Venezuela’s Communications Ministry and Foreign Ministry have not commented on the latest revelations.

Questioning the credibility of the cooperating witnesses 

During cross-examination, David Rody, and Randall Jackson, the defense lawyers for the nephews, immediately placed Gonzalez on the defensive, forcing him to admit on the stand that two confidential sources, who met the brothers and provided information to the DEA, had lied to Gonzalez and were dealing drugs themselves throughout the investigation

According to Fox News Latino, Gonzalez further admitted one of the informants sought to make enough money from the DEA to purchase a home and had also described blowing money on prostitutes in Caracas.

The agent also admitted the man used foul language in expressing a desire to have sex with Venezuela’s first lady and made a racist comment regarding Haitian people.

U.S. District Judge Paul Crotty intervened, asking the attorneys whether drug dealers cooperating with investigators had to be politically correct.

“Have the thought police invaded criminal investigations?” Crotty asked.

“Not at all, your honor,” Jackson replied.

Jackson also asked Gonzalez about some explicit thoughts his informant had toward the Venezuelan first lady.

“Do you recall [the source] saying that he would like to f–k the First Lady of Venezuela?” Jackson said, according to the New York Post.

“Yes,” Gonzalez replied.

The U.S steadily increased pressure on high-ranking members of Venezuela’s military, police, and government officials, who are accused helping transform the country into a major transit hub for the smuggling of narcotics.

Several high-ranking Venezuelan officials, including the head of military intelligence, and a former defense minister have been indicted or sanctioned in the U.S., with much more being the targets of investigations by federal law enforcement agencies.

Nicholas Maduro decried the indictments against his nephews, calling their arrests an “attack and imperial ambushes” against Venezuela.

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