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Accused wife killer was former state police commander in Mexico

November 4, 2016  |  Posted by: Francesca Falzarano
Accused wife killer was former state police commander in Mexico

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Law enforcement officials have revealed Rogelio Homero Flores, who stands accused of executing his wife in Atascocita, was a former high-ranking police chief in a Mexican border state that has been terrorized by drug-cartel corruption and violence, which has forced individuals on both sides of the law to seek asylum in Texas.

As the head of police operations in the state of Tamaulipas, which borders Southern Texas, Rogelio Homero Flores had links to disgraced former Governor Eugenio Hernandez, who is currently considered a fugitive and is facing charges of corruption by federal prosecutors in Corpus Christi.

The current Tamaulipas state police administration confirmed Flores’ former position, which he served between 2005-2010, and noted that he has no ties with the current administration.

The 55-year-old Rogelio Homero Flores could be extradited to Harris County as early as Friday after being arrested on Monday, The Houston Chronicle reported.
He was apprehended as he was driving his Cadillac SUV along U.S. 59 and was headed south, officials reported.

The case started when Flores’ brother called authorities to report that Flores told him that he had shot his wife. He also claimed that he had their 12-year-old son, and was fleeing to Mexico.

Harris County sheriff’s deputies soon forced themselves through the door of the home, where they discovered Silvia Munoz Vazquez’s lifeless body and issued an alert for police along the route to Mexico to be on the look out.

The 35-year-old victim was fatally shot with a handgun.

Harris County Sherriff’s Deputy, Thomas Gilliland, praised sheriff’s deputies in Victoria for arresting Flores so quickly without one shot fired or anyone being hurt.

Multiple cops approached Rogelio Homero Flores and ordered him to step out of the vehicle and get down on the pavement.

“Our most paramount thing was the safety of this 12-year-old,” the deputy stated.

The couple had a reputation of having arguments that were explosive enough for their neighbors to hear, however, but there was no record of physical abuse.

After he had been arrested, Flores claimed that he was a U.S. citizen.

As Flores remains behind bars, his wife’s relatives in Tamaulipas have worked to transport her remains back to Mexico.

“This is the most difficult thing a person can live through,” her heartbroken mother said.

Mike Vigil, a retired chief of international operations for the DEA, said that the suspect would have been in a rough position as a state police boss because of endemic corruption.

“I look at the Mexican State police as nothing more than criminal organizations that extort money, commit murders and engage in transportation and distribution of drugs,” Vigil said, who is also the author of the published novel “Metal Coffins,” which documents Mexican cartel treachery.

“A lot of these corrupt police officers and politicians, if they fall in line with one cartel, they can be killed by a rival cartel to eliminate any protection they provide,” Vigil added. “It is a tightrope they have to walk, a very precarious tightrope.”

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