JammedUp News

News

Aaron Hernandez threatened to kill guard, shoot his family in disciplinary: Report

May 21, 2017  |  Posted by: Francesca Falzarano
Aaron Hernandez threatened to kill guard, shoot his family in disciplinary: Report

Are you in a legal jam? Find a Lawyer, Bail Bondsman or Private Investigator on JammedUp.

The late Aaron Hernandez kept himself busy while he was behind bars at the Bristol County House of Corrections for close two years, telling one corrections officer that he dreamed of killing him and his family.

The 27-year-old former NFL player committed suicide in his cell at Souza-Baranowski Correctional Center in April, but the former Patriot’s time in prison, where he was held before and during his first murder trial, is coming to light.

A disciplinary record obtained by NBC describes Hernandez’s infractions, including telling one officer that the football player wanted to be a “father figure and show me how to be a man.” Another guard indicated that after he had refused to give Hernandez an extra tray of food, Hernandez told him he was “a scared b—-.” The report also revealed that an officer said that Hernandez threatened to kill the guard and his family.

One filing reports a dispute with another prisoner that featured the inmate spitting in Hernandez’s face and calling him a Bloods member. Another describes how Hernandez punched an inmate in the face.

aaron hernandez

Aaron Hernandez hanged himself in his cell and pronounced dead at a hospital early Wednesday, April 19, 2017. (ELISE AMENDOLA/AP)

Hernandez was arrested in June 2013 and was found guilty of first-degree murder for slaying Odin Lloyd in 2015. He was identified as Inmate #174954 and was locked up under the supervision of Sheriff Thomas Hodgson.

During a search of his cell, Hernandez was discovered with a paper that said: “MOB.” Hernandez told the guard that it meant “Money Over B——.” Hernandez was informed that it would be taken away.

Hernandez then ate the paper and told the officer, “Lock me up.”

Cell G-1 in the Special Management Unit was Hernandez’s residence for much of his time behind bars. During one response to a disciplinary finding, Hernandez refused any wrongdoing and replied “#ThisJailIsCorrupt” and “PutMoreFoodOnTrays.” He ended the note: “#WhoeverReadsThisTellTheSheriffISendMyLoveAndSendHugsAndKisses.”

Within the jail, Hernandez was transported with leg irons and double-lock shackles. There were restraints placed on his wrists, and he was often strip searched. He was permitted recreation periods once a day.

Communication between prisoners in adjacent cells was carried out through a “fishing line” of ripped paper that one officer indicated measured 15 feet in Hernandez’s cell.

Hernandez’s conviction was reduced last week. Susan Garsh, the Fall River, Massachusetts judge who oversaw the man’s murder trial, ordered that Hernandez was deemed innocent in the eyes of the commonwealth because he had not yet exhausted his appeal before his death.

Get the latest news from the world of crime