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Woman used Facebook to expose FBI snitch in Chicago assault weapons case

October 11, 2017  |  Posted by: Francesca Falzarano
Woman used Facebook to expose FBI snitch in Chicago assault weapons case Iesha Stanciel, of a mother of seven, is accused of outing and threatening an FBI mole on Facebook. (WILL COUNTY SHERIFF'S OFFICE/AP)

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A mother of seven in Illinois is facing allegations that she encouraged her Facebook followers to murder a gang member-turned-FBI snitch in a stolen firearms case after writing “snitches get stitches and found in ditches.”

Iesha Stanciel was busted after being caught with one of the brand new AR-15-type assault rifles robbed from a Chicago freight train in September 2016, The Associated Press reported.

Brian Stafford was taken into custody a month later after telling the informant he had the guns in his possession two days after the robbery.

It was Stafford’s arrest that caused Stanciel to start posting the threats on Facebook, in posts that included the informant’s name, court documents revealed, the New York Daily News reported.

“Snitches get stitches and found in ditches,” one caption read, along with 11 handgun emojis.

FBI

Iesha Stanciel, of a mother of seven, is accused of outing and threatening an FBI mole on Facebook. (WILL COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE/AP)

Another post included the informant’s picture and asked if anyone ever sees him: “If so (shoot) his head….”

Stanciel wrote in a letter to a federal judge that the posts were made up, not serious threats.

Facebook is “a fantasy community where you can live out any fantasy with no means of carrying it out,” she stated. She confessed that she had “a bad attitude” but added that she is “less dangerous than it looks.”

The judge rejected her proposal to be released before tial trial, and said she was likely dangerous.

Stanciel, 38, is facing federal cyberstalking charges along with a gun charge, and Stafford was also hit with a gun charge. Both have since pleaded not guilty.

The guns had been loaded in Atlantic City two days before the train made a stop in Chicago. The criminals took six assault rifles and 27 pistols, and also stole several TVs.

The theft infuriated residents in the crime-plagued area because it occurred one year after the robbery of over 100 weapons that fell into the hands of gang members.

The informant consented to pay Stafford $4,000 for three guns. The informant wore a wire during the exchange at Stafford’s residence, and Stafford was apprehended that day.

Stafford said in a call from jail cited by prosecutors that the informant’s performance in the operation was worth an “Academy Award.”

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