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Feds admit they misinterpreted texts from accused Russian spy Maria Butina

September 11, 2018  |  Posted by: Francesca Falzarano
Feds admit they misinterpreted texts from accused Russian spy Maria Butina

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Federal prosecutors have admitted they misinterpreted texts that they previously used as evidence to accuse Russian spy Maria Butina of offering sexual favors for access to political figures.

The government believed that Butina offered sex to someone who was not her boyfriend “in exchange for a position in a special interest organization.”

According to CNN, Butina’s lawyer repeatedly opposed this allegation, and in a court filing on Friday, federal prosecutors indicated that the government was “mistaken” in its interpretation of the messages that were used to strengthen the case.

The feds added that she still shouldn’t be released from custody on bond and that other evidence questions her commitment to her boyfriend, which prosecutors have utilized to justify their request that she stay behind bars.

Her boyfriend, who is only known as “U.S. Person 1” in court documents, reportedly meets the description of Paul Erickson, a Republican operative in South Dakota Republican with whom Butina previously told the Senate Intelligence Committee she was involved with.

“Even granting that the government’s understanding of this text conversation was mistaken, other communications and materials in the government’s possession call into doubt the claim that her relationship with U.S. Person 1 is a strong tie to ensure her appearance in court to face the charges against her if she is released,” prosecutors indicated in the court filing.

The 29-year-old entered a not guilty plea to charges that she was working as an unregistered agent of the Russian Federation in July.

Prosecutors claim that Maria Butina was taking advantage of Erickson for his access to the National Rifle Association and prominent political heads while working as an undercover agent for the Russian government.

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